Know Your Legal Rights-The US Constitutional Amendments

 

The United States Constitutional Amendments


The Fourth Amendment

The Fourth Amendment originally enforced the notion that “each man’s home is his castle”, secure from unreasonable searches and seizures of property by the government.  It protects against arbitrary arrests, and is the basis of the law regarding search warrants, stop-and-frisk, safety inspections, wiretaps, and other forms of surveillance, as well as being central to many other criminal law topics and to privacy law.

Protection against unreasonable search and seizure.

Amendment IV – The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

 

The Fifth Amendment

Amendment V – The Fifth Amendment creates a number of rights relevant to both criminal and civil legal proceedings.  In criminal cases, the Fifth Amendment guarantees the right to a grand jury, forbids “double jeopardy,” and protects against self-incrimination.

 

It also requires that “due process of law” be part of any proceeding that denies a citizen “life, liberty or property” and requires the government to compensate citizens when it takes private property for public use.

 

Fifth Amendment: No one can be tried for a serious crime unless indicted (accused) by a grand jury. No one can be forced to testify against herself or himself. No one can be punished without due process of law. People must be paid for property taken for public use.

 

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a grand jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the militia, when in actual service in time of war or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation

 


 

Charged with drug possession, driving under the influence of marijuana or alcohol?  Contact Komorn Law Immediately to protect your rights and freedom  800-656-3557.

 


 

The Sixth Amendment

Amendment V I – The Sixth Amendment guarantees the rights of criminal defendants, including the right to a public trial without unnecessary delay, the right to a lawyer, the right to an impartial jury, and the right to know who your accusers are and the nature of the charges and evidence against you.  It has been most visibly tested in a series of cases involving terrorism, but much more often figures in cases that involve (for example) jury selection or the protection of witnesses, including victims of sex crimes as well as witnesses in need of protection from retaliation.

 

Sixth Amendment: People have a right to a speedy trial, to legal counsel, and to confront their accusers. In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.

Here are all the amendments in order as well as how the states voted.

Synopsis of each ratified amendment

 

No. Subject Date submitted for Ratification[4] Date ratification completed[4] Ratification time span
1st Prohibits Congress from making any law respecting an establishment of religion, impeding the free exercise of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
2nd Protects the right to keep and bear arms. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
3rd Places restrictions on the quartering of soldiers in private homes without the owner’s consent, prohibiting it during peacetime. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
4th Prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures and sets out requirements for search warrants based on probable cause as determined by a neutral judge or magistrate. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
5th Sets out rules for indictment by grand jury and eminent domain, protects the right to due process, and prohibits self-incrimination and double jeopardy. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
6th Protects the right to a fair and speedy public trial by jury, including the rights to be notified of the accusations, to confront the accuser, to obtain witnesses and to retain counsel. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
7th Provides for the right to trial by jury in certain civil cases, according to common law. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
8th Prohibits excessive fines and excessive bail, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
9th Protects rights not enumerated in the Constitution. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
10th Reinforces the principle of federalism by stating that the federal government possesses only those powers delegated to it by the states or the people through the Constitution. September 25, 1789 December 15, 1791 2 years
2 months
20 days
11th Makes states immune from suits from out-of-state citizens and foreigners not living within the state borders; lays the foundation for sovereign immunity. March 4, 1794 February 7, 1795 11 months
3 days
12th Revises presidential election procedures by having the President and Vice President elected together as opposed to the Vice President being the runner up. December 9, 1803 June 15, 1804 6 months
6 days
13th Abolishes slavery, and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime. January 31, 1865 December 6, 1865 10 months
6 days
14th Defines citizenship, contains the Privileges or Immunities Clause, the Due Process Clause, the Equal Protection Clause, and deals with post–Civil War issues. June 13, 1866 July 9, 1868 2 years
0 months
26 days
15th Prohibits the denial of the right to vote based on race, color or previous condition of servitude. February 26, 1869 February 3, 1870 11 months
8 days
16th Permits Congress to levy an income tax without apportioning it among the states or basing it on the United States Census. July 12, 1909 February 3, 1913 3 years
6 months
22 days
17th Establishes the direct election of United States Senators by popular vote. May 13, 1912 April 8, 1913 10 months
26 days
18th Prohibited the manufacturing or sale of alcohol within the United States.
(Repealed December 5, 1933, via 21st Amendment.)
December 18, 1917 January 16, 1919 1 year
0 months
29 days
19th Prohibits the denial of the right to vote based on sex. June 4, 1919 August 18, 1920 1 year
2 months
14 days
20th Changes the date on which the terms of the President and Vice President (January 20) and Senators and Representatives (January 3) end and begin. March 2, 1932 January 23, 1933 10 months
21 days
21st Repeals the 18th Amendment and makes it a federal offense to transport or import intoxicating liquors into US states and territories where such transport or importation is prohibited by the laws of those states and territories. February 20, 1933 December 5, 1933 9 months
15 days
22nd Limits the number of times that a person can be elected president: a person cannot be elected president more than twice, and a person who has served more than two years of a term to which someone else was elected cannot be elected more than once. March 24, 1947 February 27, 1951 3 years
11 months
6 days
23rd Grants the District of Columbia electors (the number of electors being equal to the least populous state) in the Electoral College. June 16, 1960 March 29, 1961 9 months
12 days
24th Prohibits the revocation of voting rights due to the non-payment of a poll tax or any other tax. September 14, 1962 January 23, 1964 1 year
4 months
27 days
25th Addresses succession to the Presidency and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the Vice President, as well as responding to Presidential disabilities. July 6, 1965 February 10, 1967 1 year
7 months
4 days
26th Prohibits the denial of the right of US citizens, eighteen years of age or older, to vote on account of age. March 23, 1971 July 1, 1971 3 months
8 days
27th Delays laws affecting Congressional salary from taking effect until after the next election of representatives. September 25, 1789 May 5, 1992[5] 202 years
7 months
10 days

Summation of ratification data for each ratified amendment

” Y ” indicates that state ratified amendment
” N ” indicates that state rejected amendment
” Y(‡) ” indicates that state ratified amendment after first rejecting it
” Y(×) ” indicates that state ratified amendment, later rescinded that ratification, but subsequently re-ratified it
” — ” indicates that state did not complete action on amendment
 … ” indicates that amendment was ratified before state joined the Union
State
(in order of statehood)
1–10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
 Delaware Y Y N Y(‡) Y(‡) Y(‡) Y Y(‡) Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Pennsylvania Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 New Jersey Y Y Y(‡) Y(×) Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Georgia Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y
 Connecticut Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Massachusetts Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y
 Maryland Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y(‡) Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 South Carolina Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y(‡) Y N Y Y Y Y
 New Hampshire Y Y Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Virginia Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y N Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 New York Y Y Y Y Y Y(×) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 North Carolina Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Rhode Island Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Vermont Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Kentucky Y Y Y(‡) Y(‡) Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Tennessee Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Ohio Y Y Y(×) Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Louisiana Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y
 Indiana Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Mississippi Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y N Y
 Illinois Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Alabama Y Y Y Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Maine Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Missouri Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Arkansas Y Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y
 Michigan Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Florida Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Texas Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Iowa Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Wisconsin Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 California Y Y Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Minnesota Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Oregon Y Y(×) Y(‡) Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Kansas Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 West Virginia Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Nevada Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Nebraska Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Colorado Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
  North Dakota Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 South Dakota Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Montana Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Washington Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Idaho Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Wyoming Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Utah N N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Oklahoma Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y
 New Mexico Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Arizona Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y
 Alaska Y Y Y Y Y
 Hawaii Y Y Y Y Y
State
(in order of statehood)
1–10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

 

 


If you or someone you know has been charged with a crime you should have an attorney representing your interests.  Contact Komorn Law Immediately to protect your rights  800-656-3557.

 

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About Komorn Law

Komorn Law has represented numerous clients through the legal chaos of starting up a business in the Michigan Medical Marihuana Industry.

If you or someone you know is facing charges as a result of Medical Marijuana, DUI, Drugs, Forfeiture, Criminal Enterprise, etc. Please contact our office and ensure you’re defended by an experienced lawyer in the evolving laws.

Lead attorney Michael Komorn is recognized as an expert on the Michigan Medical Marihuana Act. He is the President of the Michigan Medical Marijuana Association (MMMA), a nonprofit patient advocacy group which advocates for the rights of medical marijuana patients and their caregivers.

Contact us for a free no-obligation case evaluation
800-656-3557.

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